PSD70 Learning Coach Program

A Parkland School Division Blog Site

Making Thinking Visible

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Over the past few weeks, I have been working with our learning communities on using a variety of thinking strategies during the implementation of inquiry projects.  As mentioned in an earlier post, Ron Ritchart’s work on “Making Thinking Visible” focuses on the following

  • Deeper understanding of content
  • Greater motivation for learning
  • Development of learners’ thinking and learning abilities.
  • Development of learners’ attitudes toward thinking and learning and their alertness to opportunities for thinking and learning (the “dispositional” side of thinking).
  • A shift in classroom culture toward a community of enthusiastically engaged thinkers and learners.

One thinking routine that was very well liked by our students and teachers is Chalk Talk.  In Chalk Talk, the students are asked to think about ideas presented to them, make connections to others’ responses and then question the ideas and responses of their peers. It is very easy to implement and is an excellent way to stimulate some great “silent discussion” in the classroom!

Key Thinking Processes from Chalk Talk

  • Makes room for all learners to have a voice
  • Makes learning visible by focusing on reactions, connections, and questions
  • Encourage reflective thinking.

This specific Thinking Strategy was implemented by our LC5, LC6 and LC7.  It was exciting to see is our grade 7 students who had already worked through the process became experts and went to our LC6 classrooms to coach the students through the process and provide feedback.

Student Reflections on the process of Chalk Talk

“I enjoyed the Chalk Talk experience.  Everyone cooperating and sharing ideas.  Even people who don’t usually answer questions participated.  This learning experience gave me an idea about what was to come, as well as making it interesting.”

“This was good to do because people who don’t speak out in class got to answer here.  Everyone has a chance to answer. Also, you can bump off of peers’ ideas.  You can answer questions put out by others and agree with them.  This makes our thinking visible in class.  This also helps with collaboration.  We work together to create good ideas but we are doing this silently as well, we don’t say anything! We should do this again!”

“I liked the Chalk Talk because it gave the people who don’t usually speak up in class a voice.  It pushed learning because we could feed off of each other’s ideas and ask questions.  We could look at what everyone thought, and answer questions or add to everyone’s’ thoughts”

I would highly recommend taking a look at Ron Ritchart’s work on Thinking Routines.

Claudia Scanga

  • dlander says:

    Thank you for sharing these powerful student reflections, Claudia. We know that engaging in conversation fires up our neurons, and that the ‘person doing the most talking is the person doing the most thinking’. Chalk Talk seems to be a great way to engage students in conversation, and ultimately in learning, Would love to see this in action!

    December 12, 2014 at 11:21 pm

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