November 2015 Newsletter

Here is our November 2015 Newsletter. If you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact the office or comment below.

Halloween Family Dance – October 30, 2015

We are excited to share that our School Council is hosting a Family Community Halloween Dance! This will be a fun time for the whole family. Come wearing your halloween costumes and we hope to see you there! Details are below.

PVS HALLOWEEN DANCE

Hosted by PVS School Council

Join your school in a frightening family dance!!

Date: FRIDAY, OCTOBER 30

Time: 6:30-8:30 P.M.

Location: Parkland Village School Gym 

Cost: $5/family includes entrance and an automatic chance to win 2 Oiler Club tickets (courtesy of Edmonton Trailer) – November 20th Game!!

Please come dressed in your costume or wearing black & orange. School rules apply to all costumes. (No play weapons or covering your face)

All children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian at all timesChildren are not to be dropped off.

There will be a concession with drinks & snacks for a small fee so bring spare change!

Extra Oiler Club raffle tickets available for sale separately – $2 for one/$3 for five.

For more information or to volunteer please contact Gina @ 780-965-4232 or Rochelle @ 587-989-0664

Happy_Halloween_owl_T

 

Building Resilience In Our Kids

As a dad, anytime my children are faced with a difficult circumstance, challenging situation, hear a “no” when they were hoping for a “yes”, feeling a sense of disappointment, loss or failure, my first reaction is a strong desire to “fix it”. I think most parents can relate. It breaks our hearts to see our children struggle with the various challenges that life throws their way so the immediate and natural response is that we want to protect our kids and just make everything better. If we do that though, we are missing amazing teaching moments with our kids. Each of these challenging moments are opportunities to build resiliency in our children. They are opportunities to teach our kids to persevere and not give up. They are opportunities to teach problem solving, communication, and foster a growth mindset. They are are opportunities for our students to learn how to process emotion and build the skills they need to succeed for their future.

So how do we seize these moments? Probably the most important thing is to make the time to make the connection. It is important that our kids know we are there for them and that their performance, behaviour, and choices are not tied to our love… it is unconditional. But, what do we say in those moments? Here are some potential conversation starters to have with your children the next time they are facing something difficult.

  1. How are you feeling? It is important to acknowledge and validate our children’s feelings. Although, sometimes it can seem trivial to an adult it can mean the whole world to the child. If we dismiss it as trivial our children will learn that their feelings cannot be trusted with us.
  2. Never say can’t – The words we say gives insight into our thinking and can be a predictor of our future actions. The word “can’t” can stop our children from trying. Check out this inspirational video about Jennifer Bricker – Never Say Can’t.
  3. If your friend was going through this, what advice would you give?  We can’t always choose the circumstances that life throws our way, but we can always choose our response. Help your child focus on the things they can control and have influence over, not the things out of their control.
  4. What can you learn from this? What did you do well? What can you improve? Did you try your best? Talking through and reflecting upon the lessons that can be learned from the experience will not only help with their disappointment, it encourages them to try again. Help them identify what they would do differently next time. It builds confidence that prepares them for the future.
  5. What’s next? What now? Help your child look for other opportunities and to find the positives in the experience. We need to teach our children to be solution oriented not problem fixated.
  6. What can you be thankful for? Whatever we focus on gets magnified in our lives. Magnify the good not the bad. Perspective matters. A healthy life perspective remembers all of the positives around us in the midst of a challenging circumstance.
  7. What are your strengths? Reminding our children of their successes and strengths will continue to build their confidence and self-worth. It is important for them to understand that one experience does not define their identity. For example, just because I failed does not mean I am a failure. Just because I made a bad choice does not make me a bad person.
  8. You are good at hard things. Every child has trouble when they face a challenge or find something difficult. Our children need to learn to embrace hard work and challenging activities. “Hard” isn’t something to be afraid of or shy away from. As your child to talk about hard things that they have overcome in the past.
  9. You are a problem solver. Giving our children the opportunity and support to solve their own problems, not only teaches them this essential skill for their future, it also builds their self confidence. Model the patience and perseverance required to finish difficult tasks and support them by brainstorming potential solutions. The challenge is to give the support they need while still empowering them to be problem solvers.
  10. Share your story. If you can’t think of a personal story to share that relates to what your child is facing, share someone else’s story. It is important for our children to realize they are not alone. They are not the first to deal with this and won’t be the last. Inspiration and comfort can be found in hearing other’s stories.

What are other conversation starters and ideas can you share that help build resilience in children? We would love to hear your ideas and experiences by commenting below on this post.

Student Advisory Committee

SAC 1
We are very excited to be in the process of selecting the Student Advisory Committee, every application was well thought out and showed a lot of diligence. Because of large number of students who applied, we are going to be conducting interviews to narrow the student selection process from the shortlisted applicants. Our student advisory committee will be comprised of 6 grade 4s, 4 grade 3s and 2 grade 2s. The purpose of the committee is ensure student voice and input into the process of implementing MicroSociety. All of our students will have leadership opportunities in MicroSociety throughout the year, however for this purpose we need to narrow our selection to 12 students.

Global Read Aloud

Connecting with students in other communities, helps students gain new perspectives and gives them a global perspective. We can connect with other classes through skype, twitter, google hangouts and our blogs. Today we kicked off Global Read Aloud in grade 4! We are reading the novel Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt. We started off by listening to the author read chapter one to us and then we predicted what we think will happen in the book on our padlet. We connected with @arissclass at Greystone, @millgrove4H at Millgrove, @room_ten from Manitoba. The purpose of the Global Read Aloud is to connect with classrooms all over the world and talk about the same novel. It is a great way to get student to have dialogue about what we are learning and get excited about language arts. The best thing about connecting with other students is that we hear questions like “Can I write more?” or “I love reading all these predictions”. Kids are reading and writing (which is the goal), but they are having fun so they enjoy doing it! Below is a video of how engaged the students are while they are writing and reading the predictions on the padlet.